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Thursday, July 30, 2020

Overcoming mental illness

Living With And Overcoming Mental Illness

False beliefs about mental illness can cause significant problems.

Living with mental illness is not easy. It’s a consistent problem without a clear solution. While treatments like medication and psychotherapy are incredibly helpful, sometimes people experiencing mental health conditions need to do more day-in and day-out to feel good or even just okay.
Some common self-help suggestions people receive are to exercise, meditate and be more present, which are helpful and work for many people. However, other proven methods aren’t mentioned as often. Many of them are quick and simple techniques that can easily be added to daily routines.
Finding the right coping mechanism takes time and patience, but it can enormously impact how you feel. If you haven’t had success with techniques you’ve tried, or you’re looking to add a few more to your toolkit, here are seven coping mechanisms recommended by mental health professionals worth trying out.

Why Mental Health Matters

Some people think that only people with mental illnesses have to pay attention to their mental health.
But the truth is that your emotions, thoughts and attitudes affect your energy, productivity and overall health. Good mental health strengthens your ability to cope with everyday hassles and more serious crises and challenges. Good mental health is essential to creating the life you want.
Just as you brush your teeth or get a flu shot, you can take steps to promote your mental health. A great way to start is by learning to deal with stress.


How Stress Hurts 


Stress can eat away at your well-being like acid eating away at your stomach. Actually, stress can contribute to stomach pains and lots of other problems, like:
  • headaches
  • insomnia
  • overeating
  • back pain
  • high blood pressure
  • irritability
  • vulnerability to infection

Stress also can lead to serious mental health problems, like depression and anxiety disorders. If you think you have such a problem, you can get help.
Of course you can't magically zap all sources of stress. But you can learn to deal with them in a way that promotes the well-being you want--and deserve.
Learn more about how stress really hurts.
Because millions of people in the U.S. live with a mental health condition, you likely encounter people with a mental illness in your family or in your daily life. However, if you are unsure of how best to approach someone who may be struggling, these tips may help.
Suggestions on how you may approach someone living with a mental health condition:
  • Talk to them in a space that is comfortable, where you won’t likely be interrupted and where there are likely minimal distractions.
  • Ease into the conversation, gradually. It may be that the person is not in a place to talk, and that is OK. Greeting them and extending a gentle kindness can go a long way. Sometimes less is more.
  • Be sure to speak in a relaxed and calm manner.
  • Communicate in a straightforward manner and stick to one topic at a time.
  • Be respectful, compassionate and empathetic to their feelings by engaging in reflective listening, such as “I hear that you are having a bad day today. Yes, some days are certainly more challenging than others. I understand.”
  • Instead of directing the conversation at them with ‘you’ statements, use ‘I’ statements instead.
  • Be a good listener, be responsive and make eye contact with a caring approach.
  • Ask them appropriate questions and avoid prying.
  • Give them the opportunity to talk and open up but don’t press.
  • Share some easy insights as a way of encouraging easy conversation, such as comments about the weather, the community or other.
  • Reduce any defensiveness by sharing your feelings and looking for common ground.
  • Speak at a level appropriate to their age and development level. Keep in mind that mental illness has nothing to do with a person’s intelligence.
  • Be aware of a person becoming upset or confused by your conversation with them.
  • Show respect and understanding for how they describe and interpret their symptoms.
  • Genuinely express your concern.
  • Offer your support and connect them to help if you feel that they need it. Ask, “How can I help?” if appropriate, or even, “Can I pray with you now?” if appropriate.
  • Give the person hope for recovery, offer encouragement and prayers.
Things to Avoid Saying:
  • “Just pray about it.”
  • “You just need to change you’re attitude.”
  • “Stop harping on the negative, you should just start living.”
  • “Everyone feels that way sometimes.”
  • “You have the same illness as my (whoever).”
  • “Yes, we all feel a little crazy now and then.”
Things to Avoid Doing:
  • Criticizing blaming or raising your voice at them.
  • Talking too much, too rapidly, too loudly. Silence and pauses are ok.
  • Showing any form of hostility towards them.
  • Assuming things about them or their situation.
  • Being sarcastic or making jokes about their condition.
  • Patronizing them or saying anything condescending. 
So please if you or anyone else is suffering from a illness there is help.

Tuesday, July 28, 2020


To interrupt the curve and contain the coronavirus as soon as possible, it’s better if we all stay at home and practice some social distancing.


On one hand, it’s a dream scenario to finally finish reading that book you’ve been meaning to dedicate time to for ages, whilst on the other hand, it’s the biggest nightmare. To give you some good courage and to prevent boredom, Holidu has listed the best at-home activities for you!

1. Movie night with travel films

What is the main thing that we can only dream about at the moment? Travelling! Sadly, travelling is not possible for the time being, so all that remains is to keep dreaming and making new plans for the future. So, have a great movie night with the best travel movies and documentaries available. On Netflix there are quite a few travel-related movies and documentaries to be found, for example, Expedition Happiness, Tales by Night, Our Planet, Wild, Elsewhere. Alone in Africa. Grab your popcorn!

2. Become the next master chef

Now that we’re all done hoarding the essentials, there’s no excuse as to why you can’t conjure up the best dishes on the table. Finally, you have the time to fire up a meal in the slow cooker for 5 hours or to try out tricky recipes. Are you missing travelling already? Then take the time to cook a delicious Pad Thai or prepare a Greek salad.
4. Volunteering
Research volunteering opportunities in your city and mark down the most interesting ones. When the quarantines and isolation ends, we’ll still be in a pretty precarious situation. Making a personal contribution is the best way to show the world you care.
5 . Get Creative
It may not be easy to come up with ideas. There is a plethora of classes to take online and new things to learn to do. Once you have looked around the Web, sit down and write a list of things you may want to learn how to do. Your list may look like this –
 I want to:
  • Learn Italian.
  • Learn to bake a Cheesecake.
  • Learn how to dance Salsa.
  • Learn to Draw/Paint.
  • Learn how to make a container garden.
6. Connect With Others
Whether you are a person who is dying because of social distancing or you are a person who has enjoyed the time to slow down, staying in touch with those you do life with can be a key to keeping boredom away. There are many ways to reach out and/or stay connected with people.
Some ways include:
  • Writing a letter to a friend — tell them what you like about them, why you miss being around them, what fun things you can do together once this is over.
  • Have a Virtual Brunch or a Virtual Happy Hour on video chat. 
  • Make a homemade card and mail to those you care about.
  • Have a Virtual Dance Party.
7. Practice Gratitude
Seeking gratitude and thankfulness will help you appreciate what you have. I love the memes that remind me: “I’m not STUCK at HOME, but I AM SAFE AT HOME.” That statement reinforces to me that I have options and opportunities where others may not. Make a list of everything that you are thankful for or list five things at the end of each day.
I can now see why kids say, “I’m Bored!” But I’ve learned that boredom is neither a fact or fiction, but rather, a choice of my perspective
I chose NOT to be bored.

Monday, July 27, 2020

10 Quarantine Activities

10 Quarantine Activities to Keep You and Your Kids productive!


With the spread of the Coronavirus across the U.S, our extended time at home is proving to be stressful at times for families. As you juggle working at home and keeping your kids occupied and learning, Dan Pegram, children’s author of Pop-Pop Airplane, How Do You Fly?, has shared a great list of quarantine activities that will bring the whole family together and keep everyone sane at the same time.

1. Make Some Noise

If you play a musical instrument or sing, this would be a great time to explore your children’s interest in music. If you don’t sing, impromptu singing with a wooden spoon for a microphone can entertain kids for a good 20 to 30 min. And it can give you a much needed break from sitting in front of your laptop. YouTube has an endless assortment of lessons for any instrument including vocals. Just have fun with it!

2. Look at Old Photos

Drag out the old photo albums and travel down memory lane. Show them their baby pictures and different holiday and milestone birthday pics. Children are very interested in what life was like back when we were children. They also enjoy learning about grandparents, aunts and uncles and places you’ve traveled to. It is so much fun laughing at the old photos, the retro clothing and hairstyles and reliving fun times.

3. Read Books

Reading is a skill that opens the world to youngsters. It’s also a skill that needs continuous practice. During this time away from school, introduce your children to some of your old favorite books and discovering some new titles. My new book, Pop-Pop Airplane, How Do You Fly? teaches children, ages 3 -7, how airplanes fly and is a great book for stimulating inquisitive young minds. For the more advanced readers, chapter books like Elephant & Piggie by Mo Willems are quite popular. There are also a couple of apps used by schools called EPIC! and Raz-Kids that offer unlimited access to 35,000 of the best children’s books and learning videos so your child can read and learn anytime.

4. Write

As an author I’ve been asked many times, “How do you start writing a book?” My answer is simple, “It’s just like having a conversation with someone and you’re telling them a story or relating some event in your life.” If your children aren’t familiar with journaling, this might be a great time to introduce them to this wonderful writing exercise. Journals don’t have to be formal. Any small notebook is a great place to start. Google search “journaling” for some useful ideas and benefits. Another wonderful resources is Teachers Pay Teachers, which contains printables and worksheets to help youngsters with simple writing projects.

5. Go Outside

Even though we’re quarantined at home, you can plan activities outside your house and show your children how we used to entertain ourselves before the internet and social media. Go for hikes in your neighborhood or on local trails and look for birds and other wildlife. Look up bird species in your area and then see how many you can spot. This could be the perfect excuse to skip a Zoom meeting and turn into a lifelong hobby.
7. Schoolwork
Continue your children’s assigned schoolwork and supplement the best you can. Just like the classroom environment, make this time structured and devoted to accomplishing their daily assignments. Also, create a workspace equipped with a chair, lamp, pencil holder, crayons, etc.

8. Engage Without Electronics

Monitor time in front of the television, video games, computers and iPad type devices. Assign your kids chores to do so they can earn time on their favorite devices. Set boundaries to create more balance and good practices online. And you have to put your phone down too sometimes! Spending more time engaged with your children during this uncertain period is comforting and lets them know how much you care.

9. Cook Something Together

Being stuck at home is a great time to teach your kids how to cook. And it’s a great teachable moment! So, dust off your cookbooks, pick a couple of simple recipes and let the magic begin. Your children will learn about ingredients and through measuring will learn a little about fractions. Plan your meals together and let them do some of the simple things like adding the ingredients, greasing a pan or setting the table. Spending time together at the dinner table talking about the days events, discussing this quarantine situation at their level and planning for the next day will help you communicate in new ways and learn something about how your kids think too!

10. Stay Calm

This is an unprecedented time for all of us. Remain calm, stay informed and educate your children as to why we are practicing social distancing and staying at home. Emphasize to them how important good hygiene habits are and why most everything we used to do has been curtailed (including play dates).  Ensure your children these life-changing times will be over soon and things will go back to near normal. With the exception of being quarantined, try to make each day routine and spend as much quality time together as possible. Hopefully these quarantine activities will help you and your kids get through the next few weeks and come together as a stronger family.

Sunday, July 26, 2020

10 home quarantine activities to avoid boredom

10 Quarantine Activities to Keep You and Your Kids productive!


With the spread of the Coronavirus across the U.S, our extended time at home is proving to be stressful at times for families. As you juggle working at home and keeping your kids occupied and learning, Dan Pegram, children’s author of Pop-Pop Airplane, How Do You Fly?, has shared a great list of quarantine activities that will bring the whole family together and keep everyone sane at the same time.

1. Make Some Noise

If you play a musical instrument or sing, this would be a great time to explore your children’s interest in music. If you don’t sing, impromptu singing with a wooden spoon for a microphone can entertain kids for a good 20 to 30 min. And it can give you a much needed break from sitting in front of your laptop. YouTube has an endless assortment of lessons for any instrument including vocals. Just have fun with it!

2. Look at Old Photos

Drag out the old photo albums and travel down memory lane. Show them their baby pictures and different holiday and milestone birthday pics. Children are very interested in what life was like back when we were children. They also enjoy learning about grandparents, aunts and uncles and places you’ve traveled to. It is so much fun laughing at the old photos, the retro clothing and hairstyles and reliving fun times.

3. Read Books

Reading is a skill that opens the world to youngsters. It’s also a skill that needs continuous practice. During this time away from school, introduce your children to some of your old favorite books and discovering some new titles. My new book, Pop-Pop Airplane, How Do You Fly? teaches children, ages 3 -7, how airplanes fly and is a great book for stimulating inquisitive young minds. For the more advanced readers, chapter books like Elephant & Piggie by Mo Willems are quite popular. There are also a couple of apps used by schools called EPIC! and Raz-Kids that offer unlimited access to 35,000 of the best children’s books and learning videos so your child can read and learn anytime.

4. Write

As an author I’ve been asked many times, “How do you start writing a book?” My answer is simple, “It’s just like having a conversation with someone and you’re telling them a story or relating some event in your life.” If your children aren’t familiar with journaling, this might be a great time to introduce them to this wonderful writing exercise. Journals don’t have to be formal. Any small notebook is a great place to start. Google search “journaling” for some useful ideas and benefits. Another wonderful resources is Teachers Pay Teachers, which contains printables and worksheets to help youngsters with simple writing projects.

5. Go Outside

Even though we’re quarantined at home, you can plan activities outside your house and show your children how we used to entertain ourselves before the internet and social media. Go for hikes in your neighborhood or on local trails and look for birds and other wildlife. Look up bird species in your area and then see how many you can spot. This could be the perfect excuse to skip a Zoom meeting and turn into a lifelong hobby.
7. Schoolwork
Continue your children’s assigned schoolwork and supplement the best you can. Just like the classroom environment, make this time structured and devoted to accomplishing their daily assignments. Also, create a workspace equipped with a chair, lamp, pencil holder, crayons, etc.

8. Engage Without Electronics

Monitor time in front of the television, video games, computers and iPad type devices. Assign your kids chores to do so they can earn time on their favorite devices. Set boundaries to create more balance and good practices online. And you have to put your phone down too sometimes! Spending more time engaged with your children during this uncertain period is comforting and lets them know how much you care.

9. Cook Something Together

Being stuck at home is a great time to teach your kids how to cook. And it’s a great teachable moment! So, dust off your cookbooks, pick a couple of simple recipes and let the magic begin. Your children will learn about ingredients and through measuring will learn a little about fractions. Plan your meals together and let them do some of the simple things like adding the ingredients, greasing a pan or setting the table. Spending time together at the dinner table talking about the days events, discussing this quarantine situation at their level and planning for the next day will help you communicate in new ways and learn something about how your kids think too!

10. Stay Calm

This is an unprecedented time for all of us. Remain calm, stay informed and educate your children as to why we are practicing social distancing and staying at home. Emphasize to them how important good hygiene habits are and why most everything we used to do has been curtailed (including play dates).  Ensure your children these life-changing times will be over soon and things will go back to near normal. With the exception of being quarantined, try to make each day routine and spend as much quality time together as possible. Hopefully these quarantine activities will help you and your kids get through the next few weeks and come together as a stronger family.

Thursday, July 23, 2020

The Best Diet For Mental Health

What Is the Best Diet for Mental Health?

New research exploring the connection between the foods we eat and our feelings of depression, anxiety, and happiness.



Should you eat an apple—or a bag of Oreo's? Go to McDonald’s—or the vegetarian restaurant on the corner?
When we make these everyday food choices, many of us think first of our physical health and appearance. But there’s another factor we may want to consider in picking foods: their impact on our mental health. Don't get me wrong, theirs nothing wrong with having a burger and fries I'm simply wanting to make aware of how healthy food can benefit you! 
A growing body of research is discovering that food doesn’t just affect our waistline but also our moods, emotions, and even longer-term conditions like depression. Which makes sense, after all. Our brains are physical entities, running on the energy that we put into our bodies, affected by shifts in our hormones, blood sugar levels, and many other biological processes.
Although there are many unanswered questions, the research to date can give us some guidance when we’re hunting for an afternoon snack. What we know so far can be summed up, more or less, as this: Whole-food diets heavy on the fruits, vegetables, and unprocessed protein can lift our moods and protect us from depression, while too much junk food and sugar may put our mental health at risk.
One-third of adults in America eat fast food on a given day. Many of us see French fries and chocolate cake as treats to cheer us up when we’re feeling down. But perhaps our perspective on food needs an update. With a few simple dietary changes, you might be able to improve both your mind and your mood.

Can your diet protect you from depression?

paper published this year in Psychosomatic Medicine offers one of the most up-to-date snapshots of diet and mental health—specifically, how diet might play a role in depression.
The research team scoured academic journals for experiments that had asked people to change their diets and had measured the effects. In all, they found 16 studies with nearly 46,000 participants from the United States, Australia, and Europe, ranging from ages 21 to 85.
The experiments were quite diverse, prescribing a variety of diets to boost nutrient intake, reduce fat intake, or encourage weight loss. One group went on a vegan diet, while others restricted calories; many people loaded up on fruits and vegetables while avoiding meat and processed foods. Some people attended nutrition classes together, while others got personalized counseling or simply took home a set of guidelines. They followed the diet for anywhere from a couple weeks to a few years.
The results? Overall, adopting a healthier diet did lead to reduced symptoms of depression—less hopelessness, trouble sleeping, and disconnection from others—compared to engaging in other self-improvement activities or going about life as usual.
“Including more non-processed foods, more whole foods—fruits, vegetables—is very beneficial in terms of your psychological well-being, particularly mood,” says Joseph Firth, the lead author of the paper and a research fellow at Western Sydney University.
But the results got more interesting when the researchers started to dig into the details, to see for whom and under what conditions our diet might keep the bad feelings at bay.


Who benefits most from a healthy diet?
First off, diet programs tended to work better for women. Why? Besides differences in hormones and metabolism, Firth conjectured, women seem to be in a better position to benefit. They’re more likely to be depressed, and, he says, they might have more discipline at following diets than men.

Also, the diet programs worked better if a dietary professional administered them—probably because the recommendations were sounder and the participants (believing in the dietitian’s authority) were more apt to follow them, Firth says. An earlier review of diet studies came to a similar conclusion.
One of the strongest studies in the collection suggested that diet could help people who were right in the midst of a major depressive episode. Researchers recruited 67 depressed people with poor diets, half of whom were instructed to follow a healthy, Mediterranean-style diet favoring whole grains, fruit and vegetables, legumes, low-fat dairy, nuts, fish, lean red meat, chicken, eggs, and olive oil while reducing sweets, refined grains, fried and fast food, processed meats, and sugary drinks. Across 12 weeks, they attended seven sessions with a dietitian who helped them set diet goals and stay motivated; they also received recipes, meal plans, and a hamper of food.
The other half attended sessions on a similar schedule. But rather than getting diet advice, they simply spent time with a research assistant who was trained to be supportive of them—talking about topics they were interested in, like sports and hobbies, or playing games with them for an hour.
Despite how beneficial social interaction is, the diet group fared better than the social support group. After 12 weeks, they had reduced their depression and anxiety more—and they were about four times more likely to experience a remission from their depression. The more they improved their diet, the more their depression lifted.
What about anxiety? In that particular study, anxiety did go down—but on average, across all 16 studies, healthier diets didn’t seem to make people less anxious. That actually strengthens the case that diet can directly affect depression, says Firth. If the results were simply due to people feeling proud and accomplished with their new healthy habits, you would expect them to feel better all around, including less anxious. The fact that only their symptoms of depression shifted means that something deeper may be going on. 

What could that be? We don’t know for sure yet, but there are a variety of biological processes that seem to be both influenced by diet and involved in mental health. It’s possible that certain diets may increase inflammation and oxidative stress, and disrupt our mitochondrial function and neuron production, in ways that could put us at risk for psychological problems. Our gut microbiome—the colony of microorganisms in our intestines that is increasingly being studied as a contributor to mental health—may interact with many of these processes. Also, says Firth, following a diet can bring us a sense of self-esteem and self-efficacy, as well as potential weight loss—which can influence our minds, too.
But there are still a lot of unknowns. As Professor Almudena Sanchez-Villegas of the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria points out, the findings from diet experiments are not consistent. Many of the diet programs in Firth’s review didn’t help alleviate depression, nor did a newer one that also included multivitamins. Researchers have much more to explore.
Overall healthy eating -- fruits, vegetables, healthy fats and whole grains -- has been linked in studies to lower risks of depression and even suicideNutrition also influences the immune system, which has been shown to affect the risk of depression, as well.
Try adding these five mood-boosting foods to your daily diet. Here are 5 good foods to consider!

1. Salmon

Salmon is a nutritional powerhouse full of omega-3 fatty acids, a key nutrient that our bodies don't produce on their own.

2. Dark chocolate

A Candy bar may leave you feeling blah after you eat it, but a piece of dark chocolate could give you a mood boost.



3. Berries

Fruits are all good for you as part of a balanced diet, but berries are particularly powerful for the brain.




Summery


So a Diet and mental health. There is research to suggest that what we eat may affect not just our physical health, but also our mental health and wellbeing. Eating well (i.e. a well-balanced diet rich in vegetables and nutrients) may be associated with feelings of wellbeing.

Be safe 
Comment, and Share!

Wednesday, July 22, 2020

5 Foods You Should Consider Eating

5 Foods You should Consider For Your Best Body—Inside and Out


No food can make you look younger and feel healthier overnight. But over time, getting the right nutrients can make a difference. Here's the scoop on five super foods that can help you lose weight, boost your heart health and give your skin a healthy glow.

1. Nuts...(Not Those Type of Nuts)


 In the past, nuts fell into the "bad for you" category. However, in recent years, studies show that nuts are indeed healthy. Check out the Boston Globe article for more insights into Longevity in a Nutshell.
Nuts provide key proteins and nutrients, good fats, antioxidants, aid in the reduction of cholesterol and help you live longer. Below are some the key benefits of a few different varieties of nuts:

Almonds

Highest in calcium of all nuts. Almonds are also high in fiber, vitamin E and magnesium. Almonds help lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease, and can help protect against diabetes.

Cashews

Rich in iron, high in magnesium (more than almonds), and the unsaturated fat is predominantly oleic acid (the same as in olive oil). Cashews help prevent cancer, promote a healthy heart and strong bones, and also are good for your skin and hair (they are rich in copper).

Walnuts

High in omega 3 fats, antioxidants, and phytosterols. Walnuts are good for your heart, can help protect against cancer, and are good for your brain aiding in reducing depression and the risk of age related diseases, such as Alzheimer’s.

Hazelnuts (Filberts)

Rich in unsaturated fats (mostly oleic acid), high in magnesium, calcium and vitamins B and E. Hazelnuts are good for your heart, help reduce the risk of cancer, and aid in muscle, skin, bone, joint and digestive health.

Peanuts

Technically a legume, highest amount of folates compared to other nuts; folates are essential for brain development. Peanuts are also high in Vitamin E. Peanuts promote a healthy pregnancy because of the high folates which help reduce the risk of birth defects. Peanuts also boost memory, help fight depression, and reduces the risk of heart disease.

Pecans

Although high calories and fat, they are still good for you – especially men. Pecans contain beta-sitisterol which is aids in the relief of an enlarged prostate.
The bottom line is all nuts are good for you… the key is moderation. A healthy handful can lead to good health and longer life. So go nuts!

2. Oats...(No Not Hall & Oates)


Talk about a superfood! Compared to other whole grains, oats came out on top for lowering cholesterol, according to a 2015 review of more than 20 studies. Other research shows the feel-full fiber in whole-grain oats can help you eat less and lose weight; in one study, eating oats helped people trim their waists and lose overall body fat. And oats don't stop there-they help keep your skin healthy, too, with nutrients like copper, zinc and niacin. In fact, you don't even have to eat oats to gain their skin-calming benefits: People have used forms of oats for centuries as a topical treatment for dry, rough and itchy skin.
Talk about a super food! Compared to other whole grains, oats came out on top for lowering cholesterol, according to a 2015 review of more than 20 studies. Other research shows the feel-full fiber in whole-grain oats can help you eat less and lose weight; in one study, eating oats helped people trim their waists and lose overall body fat. And oats don't stop there-they help keep your skin healthy, too, with nutrients like copper, zinc and niacin. In fact, you don't even have to eat oats to gain their skin-calming benefits: People have used forms of oats for centuries as a topical treatment for dry, rough and itchy skin.

3. Wild Salmon


You've probably heard for years that when it comes to health benefits, salmon-and wild salmon in particular-is one fantastic fish. Here's one reason why: salmon contains astaxanthin, a type of antioxidant that helps prevent heart disease by lowering cholesterol. Astaxanthin may be an anti-aging weapon, too-one 2014 study suggests it can help fight sun damage and make skin more supple. In another study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers found that people who ate omega-3-rich fish (such as salmon) each week reduced the development of precancerous skin lesions by almost 30 percent. Salmon can help with weight loss as well-studies suggest their omega-3s can help reduce belly fat.



4. Blueberries


These tasty little gems are higher in antioxidants than nearly any other food, delivering powerful heart-healthy benefits. In a Harvard study of more than 93,000 women, eating three servings of blueberries and strawberries each week was associated with cutting heart attack risk by more than 30 percent. And because antioxidants help prevent and slow sun damage, eating blueberries is a way to help your skin look younger, too. One more big blueberry perk: their fiber helps you feel full, so you eat less, potentially losing weight.

5. Avocados


Did you know that people who eat avocados tend to be healthier than those who don't? That's according to a 2013 study (funded by the Hass Avocado Board) of more than 17,000 people. The researchers found that the avocado eaters weighed less, had less belly fat and showed a much lower risk of metabolic syndrome-a group of symptoms that can lead to diabetes and heart disease-compared to the non-avocado fans. They also tended to eat more fruits and vegetables overall. We're betting they even had great skin: avocados are packed with vitamins C, E and K, all important for skin health. Plus, the healthy fat in avocados may help prevent wrinkles, while other nutrients help reduce sun damage.


ConclusionThere's a whole lot of reasons why Healthy Eating Matters. Eating well is fundamental to good health and well-being. Healthy eating helps us to maintain a healthy weight and reduces our risk of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and some cancers.